ABK6


The bunker is designed as a fully autonomous underground disaster shelter to protect six adults for 1 to 6 months without the need to leave the shelter. The bunker was designed and developed to protect people during and after disasters such as earthquakes, storms, forest fires, power blackouts, nuclear plants accidents, terrorism, nuclear or chemical terrorism, air strikes, nuclear, chemical or biological wars. It has all the necessary equipment, essential for survival and communication, and equipment that make housing more enjoyable on a longer period of time. The bunker has curved shapes, its walls are not straight, it lacks loads of traction, and is specifically designed to withstand external pressure and ground shock that exceeds 8 degrees on the Richter scale.

ABK8


The bunker is designed as a fully autonomous underground disaster shelter to protect eight adults for 1 to 6 months without the need to leave the shelter. The bunker was designed and developed to protect people during and after disasters such as earthquakes, storms, forest fires, power blackouts, nuclear plants accidents, terrorism, nuclear or chemical terrorism, air strikes, nuclear, chemical or biological wars. It has all the necessary equipment, essential for survival and communication, and equipment that make housing more enjoyable on a longer period of time. The bunker has curved shapes, its walls are not straight, it lacks loads of traction, and is specifically designed to withstand external pressure and ground shock that exceeds 8 degrees on the Richter scale.

ABK10


The bunker is designed as a fully autonomous underground disaster shelter to protect ten adults for 1 to 6 months without the need to leave the shelter. The bunker was designed and developed to protect people during and after disasters such as earthquakes, storms, forest fires, power blackouts, nuclear plants accidents, terrorism, nuclear or chemical terrorism, air strikes, nuclear, chemical or biological wars. It has all the necessary equipment, essential for survival and communication, and equipment that make housing more enjoyable on a longer period of time. The bunker has curved shapes, its walls are not straight, it lacks loads of traction, and is specifically designed to withstand external pressure and ground shock that exceeds 8 degrees on the Richter scale.




Who needs an underground shelter for emergency situations?

From our point of view, any family, or company needs a shelter that they can use to protect themselves against any threats to personal safety due to extreme events.

There are many reasons that can justify the need for an underground shelter but each individual regards the matter through its personal point of view, depending on the way he perceives the threats that may affect its safety and that of his loved ones. Even if events such as wars, earthquakes, or natural disasters are very unlikely to occur in some areas, no one can guarantee that such an event will or will not take place, bearing in mind that our world is evolving and constantly changing. Therefore, even if we all hope that none of our customers will ever have to use this equipment, we believe that the its sole existence is a real, solid and palpable insurance, that guarantees survival in case of imminent threats. Another thing that is important to mention is that such an investment requires time to be completed and ready to use, so it is imperative to be executed in advance, since the occurrence of any extreme events, which in all cases are unpredictable, will make the execution of an underground shelter impossible.

There are many situations that justify the use of an underground shelter, some more likely to happen, others with lower probabilities to occur, but beyond probabilities and assumptions there is a fact, and that is the impossibility to guarantee that one is safe from hazards, regardless of his or hers geographical location. Our underground bunkers are designed so as to ensure the survival, protection and comfort of its occupants in the event of any, and not only, of the events listed below:

  • Armed conflict, in which weapons of mass destruction are used, including nuclear, biological and chemical weapons;
  • Earthquakes;
  • Nuclear power plants accidents;
  • Road accidents involving vehicles carrying radioactive waste;
  • Natural disasters such as storms, tsunamis, tornadoes;
  • Large-scale fires such as forest fires;
  • Severe economic crisis with extreme consequences such as famine, in which the safety of the individual is threatened by other individuals capable of desperate gestures;
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What are the effects of the explosion itself and the thermal pulse in case of detonating of an atomic bomb?

An atomic bomb generates a devastating energy, both in the explosion when it releases at least half of its energy and the shock wave that destroys everything above ground on a certain distance from ground zero, as well as under the shape of thermal pulse appears after the explosion incorporating 35 % of the bomb’s energy and can cause fire or burns due to hot air circulating with high speed.

It is obvious that the effects of atomic bombs are even more devastating as the bomb is bigger. To highlight more effectively the effects that result from the detonation of an atomic bomb we will consider an example that is based on the scenario of a 500 KT nuclear bomb detonation. As a comparison we consider useful to mention that the bomb detonated over Hiroshima in 1945 had only 15 KT. We chose this example because most of today's nuclear weapons are smaller in size, but more powerful as they have about 500 KT or less, and if we speak of nuclear submarine missiles they average 200 KT.

Thus if a 500 KT atomic bomb is detonated in open space there is a ring with a radius of 3.5 km within which the effects are devastating and no one and nothing above the ground has any chance of survival. After this limit of 3.5 km, the shock wave and thermal pulse arrive after 8 seconds after the initial moment of the explosion. At 8 km from ground zero, there is a window of 20 seconds before the shock wave and thermal pulse arrive. These seconds are essential for survival and can make the difference between life and death, as there is chance of survival if an underground shelter is reached, or simply by lying down at ground level which would significantly increase chances of survival.

We consider that we have an individual in open space when the 500 KT bomb is detonated, and we analyze the effects that the initial explosion, the shock wave and thermal pulse have on the individual and what are his chances of survival. We mention that here we refer only to surviving the explosion, without studying the devastating secondary effects of radiation accompanying nuclear explosions. Thus if the individual is within 3.5 km ring, his chances of survival are zero if he is above ground level. If he is at 3.5 kilometers from ground zero, the shock wave and thermal pulse would reach him after 8 seconds. The power of the explosion probably would pierce his eardrums and would have to face for 3 seconds the shock wave that has a speed of 475 km / h, and that would cause a fatal impact. To these we add the wounds caused by fragments of the projectile, and severe burns caused by heat pulse. The individual would have chances of survival only if he finds underground shelter. After all this it is needless to say that the radiation effects are very serious.

An underground shelter would ensure the survival of its occupants and offer protection against the effects of blast and thermal pulse and lethal radiation whose intensity decreases by 99 % in the first 48 hours.

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What are the effects of nuclear radiation and radioactive fallout?

When a nuclear bomb is detonated, besides the energy generated by the initial explosion, released under the form explosion force, shock wave and thermo pulse, the most devastating consequences are caused by radioactive radiation.

Radiation cannot be seen, or felt, and it is not materialized in any way, as most radioactive particles are invisible to the human eye but it has extremely serious effects on the health of individuals who are exposed, often causing death. Therefore not the initial explosion makes the most victims, but radiation which cause the loss of a much larger number of lives.

After a nuclear explosion, the resulting radioactive isotopes may be short-lived, and generate high levels of radiation, but lose power in a shorter time, or with a long life to withstand long periods of time and emit radiation with a lower intensity but constantly. For example, iodine-131 isotopes have a half-life of eight days while strontium-90 isotopes have a half-life of 28 years, cesium-137 30 years and isotopes of carbon-14 have a half-life of 5700 years.

The stronger the explosion the higher radioactive particles are lifted into the air and it takes a longer time for these particles to settle on the ground. Thus if a 100 KT nuclear bomb is detonated, the power of the explosion does not lift the particles above the troposphere, and thus they settle back on the ground within a few months, maybe sooner, as they are brought to the ground by weather phenomena. If a megaton bomb is detonated, the radioactive particles are lifted up to the stratosphere, where there is no precipitation, and thus it may take and years until particles are brought back to the ground.

The highest level of radiation is generated by particles that are closer to ground zero because they are larger and have a higher radioactive power. However any particles that reach hundreds or even thousands of miles away from ground zero should not be neglected. Despite the small size of these particles, they can have very serious effects on human health.

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